Chive Blossom Vinegar Recipe

Early spring harvest… It’s almost a non-existent concept for Wyoming peeps like me.

Our growing season is short. It starts late and ends early…. which means while everyone else is bragging about their first harvests of greens and radishes, I’m still looking at snow on the ground. And even when the first pictures of ruby red strawberries and cucumbers start flooding social media, my harvest baskets are still empty.

But I do have one thing.

Chive blossoms. Lots and lots of ’em.

chive blossom vinegar recipe

I’ve long been a fan of chives. I’ll put them on every dish I can think of when they are growing outside my laundry room window each year, and I love pinching a bit between my fingers when I’m weeding, just so I can enjoy the sharp, oniony scent.

Admittedly, I haven’t done much with the the cheery purple blossoms… other than admire them from afar and occasionally stick them in a random jar to adore the supper table.

But that’s changing y’all. Because I discovered how to make chive blossom vinegar, and I’M IN LOVE.

chive blossom vinegar recipe

It’s as easy as grabbing a handful or two of chive blossoms, tossing them in a jar, and filling with a generous glug of vinegar.

It turns the most amazing shade of pink after a week or two, and then you use it like you would any other vinegar, except chive blossom vinegar carries the most delicious onion flavor.

It’s pretty awesome. stuff.

Sprinkle chive blossom vinegar over homemade french fries, your favorite salad greens, or roasted veggies. I even added several tablespoons of it to to the water as I boiled potatoes for potato salad the other day and it brought a noticeable punch of flavor to the finished salad.

Chive blossom vinegar is one of those special homestead foods like whey— you can’t buy at the store, but you can certainly make at home for a few pennies. Try it and let me know whatcha think!

chive blossom vinegar recipe

Chive Blossom Vinegar Recipe

You Will Need:

  • 2 cups chive blossoms (fresher, newer blossoms are best- skip the older, faded ones)
  • 2-3 cups white vinegar
  • Quart-sized glass jar with plastic lid

Instructions:

Soak and wash the blossoms (little bugs like to hide inside sometimes!)

chive blossom vinegar recipe

Drain off the water and thoroughly pat dry between a dishtowel.

chive blossom vinegar recipe

Fill the jar 1/2 to 2/3 full of chive blossoms

Pour the vinegar in a small saucepan and warm over medium heat. (Don’t let it boil– keep it just below a simmer)

chive blossom vinegar recipe

Pour the warm vinegar over the blossoms, and stir thoroughly. You can crush or mash the blossom just a bit to help them release their flavor.

Cap the jar (I like to use a plastic lid to avoid corrosion from the vinegar) and place in a cool, dark place for 2-3 weeks to steep.

chive blossom vinegar recipe

Strain out the blossoms and store the finished chive blossom vinegar in your cabinet. It should last many months!

Chive Blossom Vinegar Recipe Notes

  • Other types of vinegar will work here as well– white wine vinegar is especially nice. However, keep in mind that using stronger flavored vinegars (like apple cider) will change the rosy pink color and flavor
  • You can shorten the steeping time, but it will lessen the intensity of the finished chive blossom vinegar flavor
  • You can double (or quadruple!) this recipe if you have lots of chive blossoms. And I only included the measurements in this recipe for those of us who like lots of details. 😉 There is lots of room for adjustments here– nothing is hard and fast.

chive blossom vinegar recipe

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Chive Blossom Vinegar Recipe

chive blossom vinegar recipe

  • Author: Jill Winger
  • Prep Time: 5 minutes
  • Cook Time: 0 minutes
  • Total Time: 5 minutes
  • Yield: 2-3 cups
  • Category: Condiment

Ingredients

  • 2 cups chive blossoms (fresher, newer blossoms are best- skip the older, faded ones)
  • 2–3 cups white vinegar
  • Quart-sized glass jar with plastic lid

Instructions

Soak and wash the blossoms (little bugs like to hide inside sometimes!)

Drain off the water and thoroughly pat dry between a dishtowel.

Fill the jar 1/2 to 2/3 full of chive blossoms

Pour the vinegar in a small saucepan and warm over medium heat. (Don’t let it boil– keep it just below a simmer)

Pour the warm vinegar over the blossoms, and stir thoroughly. You can crush or mash the blossom just a bit to help them release their flavor.

Cap the jar (I like to use a plastic lid to avoid corrosion from the vinegar) and place in a cool, dark place for 2-3 weeks to steep.

Strain out the blossoms and store the finished chive blossom vinegar in your cabinet. It should last many months!

Notes

  • Other types of vinegar will work here as well– white wine vinegar is especially nice. However, keep in mind that using stronger flavored vinegars (like apple cider) will change the rosy pink color and flavor
  • You can shorten the steeping time, but it will lessen the intensity of the finished chive blossom vinegar flavor
  • You can double (or quadruple!) this recipe if you have lots of chive blossoms. And I only included the measurements in this recipe for those of us who like lots of details. 😉 There is lots of room for adjustments here– nothing is hard and fast.

The post Chive Blossom Vinegar Recipe appeared first on The Prairie Homestead.

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